Tag Archives: Rental

Tenant and Landlord Responsibilities for a Rental Property

Whether you are a tenant or a landlord, it is important that both the tenant and the landlord have a fair understanding of the required responsibilities and rights, to have a peaceful and pleasant renting experience.

Property Dealers in Dwarka involved in renting business offer society flats, apartments and DDA flats for rent in Dwarka. The people who rent these residential properties are called tenants. When a person rent a property, the basic rights and responsibilities of both the tenant and the landlord are spelled out in the lease agreement. To avoid confusion and legal disputes, both the landlord and the tenant must be aware of these responsibilities and rights.

Types of Tenancy Agreement

Indian Tenancy agreement consists of 2 different types of contracts namely The Lease Agreement covered by the Rent Control Laws and the Lease and License Agreement, which is not covered. The first option allows the tenant to get the ownership of property for an undefined period of time. This becomes a big problem when the tenant refuses to vacate and to find a legal solution to this problem may take the court a very long time of 10 or 20 years. The second option however, is more viable as it comes with conditional agreement of ownership for a limited period of time with the option to renew with certain changes in rent and stay. This is the most popular contract which most of the real estate agents in Dwarka choose.

Deciding on Rent

A Lease Agreement is covered by the Rent Control Laws. The landlord can decide on the amount of rent by adhering to a formula devised by the judicial government, local executive or legislative. According to that formula, the maximum annual rent for Delhi is a combination of 10% of the expense of property construction and market price of the land. Both these costs are dependent on the historical values where current market valuation is not taken into account. Therefore, with old properties you can expect smaller rent, whereas new properties can give profitable margins to the landlord. The rent can also be increased marginally by including the cost of renovating a property.

Responsibilities Both Tenant and Landlord Should Share

A responsible tenant should pay off the rent and other rental bills associated, within the mentioned time period in accordance of the agreement. If by any chance, the tenant fails to pay the rent within the mentioned time period, the tenant in Delhi is subjected to pay simple interest at the rate of 15 per cent per annum. The rate of interest should be calculated from the due date of the rent to the period it was paid off.

Similarly, there are also some responsibilities the landlord should share. The Property Dealers in Dwarka, New Delhi should provide a rent receipt as a proof of the paid rent to the tenant. If a landlord fails to provide a rent receipt, the tenant has the right to complain to the consumer court. In such a scenario, the authority can bring a solution by listening to both the parties whereby compensating the tenant by the landlord. There are certain rules which the tenant should follow like complaining within a period of 2 months from the payment date. The tenant has the right to ask for bank particulars of the landlord to deposit the rent money. Without such availability, the tenant can choose to deposit the same through money order.

If a landlord wants to revise the rent, he/she should notify the tenant beforehand. A formal notice according to the rule listed down in the section 106 of the Transfer of Property Act 1882 should be sent bearing the signature of the landlord.

How to Effectively Market Your Rental Income Properties

Anyone who has been engaging in real estate investing for any amount of time has surely tried to sell an investment property at one time or another.

It’s called marketing. Over my thirty-year real estate career, I certainly did my share. And though my attempts didn’t always produce a successful outcome, the experience taught me a few things about marketing rental income property I would like to pass along.

Most are common sense, but mentioned as a reminder because there are realtors and sellers out there who need to hear it. The remaining tips are more subjective, but included to help you consider what might be a more effective marketing approach than you’re using.

Foremost, never make your marketing packages too vague. When you omit important financial data, it makes it very difficult for a buyer to adequately determine whether or not it presents a good investment opportunity. And this will typically lead to a further exchange of data with a buyer or agent that, at the very least, will be time-consuming, and at the worst, could cause a buyer to lose interest in the deal altogether.

Secondly, resist the temptation to skew the property’s financial data to appear overly optimistic. Perhaps rents can get raised, for instance, and you want to reveal that. But if you over-inflate what you deem could be future rents, you risk losing your credibility with the buyer, or may end up wasting your time in a deal that never has a chance anyway, once it’s subjected to the buyer’s due diligence. Keep your estimated assumptions realistic.

Thirdly, and this is a bit more subjective, don’t present marketing packages that contain everything but the proverbial kitchen sink-at least not in your initial presentation. In my opinion, distributing more than a three-page property report at your local investment club meeting or in response to a telephone inquiry, is overkill. Remember, you’re just trying to generate a response from credible investors with a valid interest; a more comprehensive set of reports can always get presented during subsequent exchanges.

Okay, now let me show you the essentials that worked for me. For simplicity, I’ve organized them by category: the numbers, and the reports.

The Numbers

Aside from sale price (which is a given), you’ll want to provide an itemized break down for the property’s annual cash flow, and computations for at least two rates of return.

1. Cash Flow

Cash flow is crucial because it’s essentially what the real estate investor is purchasing in the rental property. So compute it for at least the first year of ownership by focusing on the following three financial elements:

  • Gross Rental Income
  • Operating Expenses
  • Debt Service

2. Rates of Return

The rates of return (at least the two listed below) are important for the investor to determine whether or not his or her yields get met as well as providing a good way to compare the property’s financial performance and value to other similar-type rental properties in the market area.

  • Cap Rate
  • Cash-on-Cash

The Reports

Here are two reports I commonly used for initial inquiries. Both clearly show the rental property’s cash flow, and each include the cap rate and cash-on-cash rates of return. So they are informative, easy to read and understand, and straight to the point. Consider them as examples.

1. Marketing flyer

This announces the listing to the community-at-large (i.e., investment meetings, call-ins, and inquiries from colleagues). (Sample available on my site).

2. APOD

This enables you to show your own investor-customers a likely scenario during the first year of ownership. (Sample available on my site).

In a Nutshell

An effective way to market rental income property is to consider the process in two stages: the initial presentation, and the subsequent follow-up. Keep the initial presentation concise; even one report with enough data to reveal the property’s description, estimated cash flow, and investor’s rate of return should be adequate to garner interest from credible buyers when they exist. And reserve all the other reports (e.g., acquisition funds, proforma income statement, rent roll) to the subsequent follow-up exchanges.